“Persuasion” by Jane Austen

January is still in my grasp! Here is a review that was supposed to be posted last year…

PersuasionPersuasion by Jane Austen
223 pages
First published 1817
Not part of the 2013 book challenge (2012 book)

 

 

 

Persuasion might be my favourite Austen, closely sneaking upon Pride and Prejudice. The short synopsis was heartbreaking and touching, and served a worthy prelude to the novel itself. Anne Elliot and Frederick Wentworth were the perfect match, young and in love. However, Anne is persuaded by her trusty mentor, Lady Russel, that she can make a better match. Eight years pass, and Anne never does make a better match… Until fate deals her another chance, and Mr Wentworth, now Captain, is brought back into her life. But will Anne yield to persuasion once more?

I have a very fanciful idea that Persuasion is full of bits of Jane Austen’s own life. Considering that it was her final novel, it is noticeable that the pursued theme is more mature than the others. Its subdued length makes the novel an easier read than the other Austen works. I think this is a good book to recommend to a reader new to Austen’s style, which tends to be heavily descriptive and florid.

As for some spoilers…My heart truly stopped when Wentworth returned and handed Anne the letter. And my hands tremored as I read his letter along with Anne. I loved this novel!

Anne is a wonderful character. Unpretentious and honest, outspoken and yet reserved, she easily engages the reader’s sympathy. I marvel at her ability to be quiet, listening to every bit of senseless gossip, yet always have an opinion of her own, never succumbing to the silly worries of the rich and the proud.

Verbatim

This is where lovely quotes go.

‘My idea of good company, Mr Elliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.’ (page136)

Ditto, Anne, ditto!

Rating

5-stars

Also I completed my English exam today! Woohoo!

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